outpatient treatment for PAD at Center for Vascular Medicine

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) affects as many as 8 million people, many of them over the age of 50. PAD can raise the risk of limb loss, heart attack and stroke because arteries become clogged and bloodflow to the organs is reduced.

The Center for Vascular Medicine offers diagnosis and treatment for PAD in several convenient locations around Maryland. All phases of diagnosis and treatment can be performed in our comfortable Diagnosis is typically easy, painless and noninvasive: the first test for PAD is an ankle brachial index (ABI), which involves placing blood pressure cuffs on the arms and legs to compare the blood pressure of each. If deemed necessary, an ultrasound may be recommended to provide our staff with more detailed information about your condition.

In some cases, abnormal results from noninvasive testing may require an angiograqphy. This provides your physician with an x-ray of the arteries and a clearer understanding of how best to treat a patient and restore health. CVM has 3 conveniently located state of the at angiography suites in Central, Eastern and Southern Maryland. Invasive studies and interventional treatments can be performed as a same day procedure at these centers, the process is more convenient for patients and reduces the anxiety they might feel in a hospital setting.

The staff of CVM treats each patient as a family member, ensuring they understand each procedure and are relaxed and comfortable. With a nurse to patient ratio far lower than that found in a hospital, patients receive personalized, caring treatment and are educated on possible lifestyle changes that can improve their health after being treated for PAD. Our doctors and staff have an in depth knowledge of the risk factors associated with PAD and how best to reduce your chances of a recurrence of symptoms.

Visit our website for additional information on symptoms and risk factors for PAD to see if you should schedule a consultation at CVM to address your concerns.

Posted in: peripheral artery disease

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